FAQs2023-03-20T17:20:32+00:00

FAQs

What are TCFD reporting requirements?2023-08-24T14:35:46+00:00

TCFD or Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures reporting has a set of guidelines for companies to follow when disclosing information about their governance, strategy, risk management, and metrics and targets related to climate change, ensuring that they meet the TCFD requirements. The TCFD requirements are an industry-led initiative and are voluntary for companies outside of the UK, however they are becoming widely recognised and supported by investors, regulators and other stakeholders as a best practice for providing high-quality, consistent and transparent climate-related financial disclosures. The TCFD reporting requirements are set out to cover four key themes, including governance, strategy, risk management and metrics and targets.

1. Governance: Within the TCFD report the theme of governance focuses on information about the board of directors and their overview of climate-related risks and opportunities for a improvements, including the role of senior management in overseeing the organisation’s climate strategy.

2. Strategy: Within a TCFD report it includes information on how the company is positioning itself in the transition to a low-carbon economy, including its goals and targets related to climate change.

3. Risk Management: A TCFD report includes information on how the company is managing the risks and opportunities associated with climate change, together with its processes for identifying, assessing, and managing climate risks.

4. Metrics and Targets: TCFD reports include information on the company’s emissions, energy use, and other relevant metrics, as well as its targets for reducing emissions and improving energy efficiency. TCFD reporting requirements are designed to be easy to follow and flexible to ensure that companies can tailor their disclosures to their specific circumstances. The TCFD recommendations provide guidance on what types of information organisations should include, and how to present it, in order to provide stakeholders with a comprehensive and meaningful understanding of a company’s approach to climate change.

Ecometrica are the only software company that combines location specific data to analyse climate related risks, and powerful GHG accounting (including scope 1, scope 2 and scope 3) to comply with mandatory TCFD disclosure.

What are TCFD reports?2023-06-02T13:55:19+00:00

TCFD or Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures reports are a framework that organisations follow to disclose their potential climate-related financial impact, providing stakeholders, such as investors, lenders, and insurance underwriters with this information. The TCFD is an industry-led initiative and is currently voluntary for organisations outside the UK. TCFD recommendations provide guidance for companies on how to disclose information about their governance, strategy, risk management, and metrics and targets related to climate change. TCFD aims to improve the quality and comparability of climate-related financial disclosures, supporting the financial industry in making informed decisions about the allocation of capital. A TCFD report may also provide information on how an organisation is adapting to a low-carbon and more sustainable future, positioning itself to manage the financial risks and opportunities associated with climate change.

Is TCFD reporting mandatory?2023-09-28T10:17:47+00:00

TCFD or Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures reporting is now mandatory for organisations headquartered in the UK with more than 500 employees for the financial year’s (22/23) annual reports and onwards. It is likely the US and Canada will follow mandatory disclosure for listed companies in the next financial year. The TCFD is an industry-led initiative established by the Financial Stability Board (FSB) designed for consistent climate-related financial disclosures. Organisations are encouraged to follow TCFD reporting and recommendations. TCFD recommendations are becoming widely recognised and supported by investors, regulators, and other stakeholders, with many investors increasingly demanding that companies disclose information in line with the TCFD recommendations as part of their investment decisions. Countries like the United Kingdom, have already made it mandatory for large companies to report their greenhouse gas emissions and climate impact, making this information readily available to investors and stakeholders. Although TCFD reporting is currently voluntary outside of the UK, it is becoming increasingly important for companies to undertake TCFD reporting and recommendations in order to display their dedication to sustainability and transitioning to a low-carbon economy.

What is the purpose of the TCFD?2023-03-08T11:56:15+00:00

TCFD or Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosure, was designed as a voluntary framework for organisations to follow to disclose consistent climate-related financial information to investors, lenders and insurance underwriters, about their potential impacts on climate change as well as financial performance. TCFD was established by the Financial Stability Board (FSB) as an industry-led initiative to help organisations understand, manage and communicate their climate-related risks and opportunities. The TCFD aims to provide companies with a standardised framework to follow, helping to improve the quality and comparability of climate-related financial disclosures, as well as supporting the financial industry in making informed decisions about the allocation of capital. The TCFD framework includes 11 recommendations covering four key areas, governance, strategy, risk management and metrics and targets. The 11 TCFD recommendations are designed to help companies assess and disclose the physical, transition and liability risks posed by climate change, as well as their efforts to mitigate these risks and take advantage of any opportunities to implement improvements. Although the TCFD framework is mainly voluntary (with the exception of companies headquartered in the UK with over 500 employees), it is becoming increasingly important for organisations to adopt it, with more investors and stakeholders placing an emphasis on the role of companies to address the impacts of climate change. Organisations that undertake TCFD reporting are able to provide valuable information to investors and stakeholders, demonstrating their commitment to moving towards a more sustainable and low-carbon economy in the future. Ecometrica are the only software company that combines location specific data to analyse climate related risks, and powerful GHG accounting (including scope 1, scope 2 and scope 3) to comply with mandatory TCFD disclosure.

What is TCFD reporting?2023-08-24T14:34:48+00:00

TCFD or Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosure, is an industry-led initiative established by the Financial Stability Board (FSB). It was designed to develop recommendations for voluntary, consistent climate-related financial disclosure. TCFD aims to provide clear and useful information to investors, lenders and insurance underwriters about the potential impacts of climate change on an organisation and its financial performance. TCFD reporting follows a specific framework, providing organisations with guidelines to disclose their climate-related risks and opportunities in a standardised, consistent and comparable format. The TCFD framework includes 11 recommendations covering four key areas, governance, strategy, risk management and metrics and targets. The 11 TCFD recommendations are designed to help companies assess and disclose the physical, transition and liability risks posed by climate change, as well as their efforts to mitigate these risks and take advantage of any opportunities to implement improvements. Although the TCFD framework is voluntary, it is becoming increasingly important for organisations to adopt it, with more investors and stakeholders placing more emphasis on the role of companies to address the impacts of climate change. Organisations that undertake TCFD reporting are able to provide valuable information to investors and stakeholders, demonstrating their commitment to moving towards a more sustainable and low-carbon economy in the future. Ecometrica has the only software platform that combines location specific data to analyse climate related risks, and powerful GHG accounting (including scope 1, scope 2 and scope 3) to comply with mandatory TCFD disclosure.

What is the difference between ESOS and SECR?2023-03-08T11:56:40+00:00

ESOS (Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme) and SECR (Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting) are both energy and carbon reporting schemes that organisations within the United Kingdom follow. However, the two scheme frameworks differ from one another, having different purposes, coverage, reporting requirements and formats.

Purpose: ESOS – Designed to help companies identify cost-effective energy efficiency opportunities. SECR – Designed to improve the quality and transparency of energy and carbon reporting by companies.

Coverage: ESOS – Only applicable to large companies in the UK with over 250 employees or an annual turnover of over €50 million and an annual balance sheet total of over €43 million. SECR – Only applicable to companies listed on the main market of the London Stock Exchange with more than 250 employees.

Reporting requirements: ESOS – Requires companies to carry out an energy audit every four years and to report on their energy consumption and efficiency opportunities. SECR – Requires companies to report on their energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in their annual financial reports.

Detail of reporting: ESOS – In-depth and comprehensive reporting, involving a full energy audit and the identification of energy efficiency opportunities. SECR – Reporting designed to be straightforward and cost-effective, that focuses on the recording of energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Both frameworks are designed to promote energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and their different requirements should be complied to by companies across the UK.

How do you calculate SECR?2023-03-08T11:56:57+00:00

SECR or Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting is the calculation of an organisation’s total energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. To calculate a company’s SECR emissions use the following steps:

1. Identify the scope of energy consumption: Companies must report on their energy consumption for electricity, gas, and transport fuel. This includes both direct and indirect energy use.

2. Measure energy consumption: Companies must collect data on their energy consumption, including the amount and type of energy used, as well as the source of the energy (e.g. renewable or non-renewable).

3. Calculate greenhouse gas emissions: Companies must calculate the greenhouse gas emissions associated with their energy consumption using the appropriate conversion factors. These conversion factors take into account the carbon dioxide equivalent emissions of different greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide.

4. Report emissions: Companies must report their energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in their annual financial reports, including the methodology used to calculate emissions and any relevant energy efficiency measures that have been implemented. SECR reporting is designed to be easy to follow and cost-effective for organisations to undertake, often using existing data and processes to comply with SECR requirements. To ensure that companies are meeting mandatory SECR requirements expert advice and knowledge is often sought out, Ecometrica has been assisting with the calculation and reporting of SECR emissions since their introduction.

What is SECR disclosure?2023-03-08T07:43:17+00:00

SECR, also known as Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting, is a mandatory framework in the United Kingdom that certain large companies are required to follow, disclosing their energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in their annual financial reports. SECR disclosure is part of the reporting process, recording, analysing and sharing their environmental impact data and the actions they will take to reduce their energy consumption and carbon footprint. The SECR disclosure process was implemented in the UK in April 2019 and is designed to be easy to follow and cost-effective for organisations to follow, often using existing data and processes to comply with SECR requirements. The disclosure of this information allows for comparison of large organisations’ environmental impact, helping to encourage and drive change, with the focus being on reducing carbon emissions and supporting the transition towards a low-carbon economy. Ecometrica has been helping companies disclose to the SECR framework since its introduction.

What does SECR mean?2023-03-08T07:43:18+00:00

SECR is often used as the abbreviation for Streamlined Energy and Carbon Reporting. SECR is a mandatory framework in the United Kingdom for certain large companies to follow, reporting on their energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in their annual financial reports. This framework was introduced in the UK in April 2019, replacing the previous reporting framework, the Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme (ESOS). The introduction of the new SECR framework aimed to improve the quality and transparency of energy and carbon reporting in the UK, helping large companies to understand and reduce their energy consumption and carbon footprint. Large organisations are required to report annually on their energy use, including electricity, gas and transport fuel consumption, as well as their greenhouse gas emissions. The SECR is designed to ensure that the reporting requirements are easy to follow for large companies, cost-effective and allows existing data and processes to be used within the SECR framework. Ecometrica can help with your SECR reporting requirements.

How does the CDP framework work?2023-08-24T14:20:52+00:00

The CDP framework provides a standardised platform for cities, governments and organisations to disclose, collect and analyse environmental data, benchmarking performance, and engaging stakeholders, driving actions to move towards a more sustainable future. The CDP framework is laid out as follows:

1. Environmental disclosure: The CDP provides a standardised questionnaire for companies, cities, and governments to disclose information on their environmental impact, including their greenhouse gas emissions, water use, and deforestation. The questionnaire is designed to be comprehensive, covering a wide range of sustainability topics and providing a detailed view of a company’s environmental impact.

2. Data collection and analysis: The CDP collects the environmental data disclosed by companies, cities, and governments and uses it to create a comprehensive database of environmental information. The data is then analysed to provide insights into the environmental impact of companies, cities, and governments, tracking their progress on sustainability goals.

3. Scoring and benchmarking: The CDP uses the disclosed data to calculate a company’s CDP score, which is a rating based on its environmental impact. Companies are scored on a scale of 0-100 based on the quality and quantity of their environmental impact, and the results are used to compare the performance of different companies against their peers, helping to drive improvements in sustainability practices.

4. Stakeholder engagement: The CDP works with investors, purchasers, and other stakeholders to leverage the power of market forces to encourage companies to reduce their environmental impact and to adopt more sustainable business practices. The CDP provides stakeholders with access to the environmental information disclosed by companies, cities, and governments, and engages with them to drive market transformation towards a more sustainable future.

Ecometrica is CDP’s only gold partner across climate, water and forests and has been helping companies with their CDP disclosures since 2010.

What does CDP stand for in climate change?2023-03-08T07:43:21+00:00

CDP was previously known as the Carbon Disclosure Project, but is now shortened to CDP. This is an international non-profit organisation, that provides a platform for cities, governments, and a wide range of companies, to measure, manage and share information about their environmental impact. This information is shared within a CDP report and includes details about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, alongside actions that will be or are currently being implemented to reduce them. The CDP and its reporting process is focused on driving action on reducing cities, organisations and individuals impact on climate change, by promoting transparency and accountability to help move towards a more sustainable and environmentally friendly future. Ecometrica is CDP’s only gold partner across climate, water and forests and has been helping companies with their CDP disclosures since 2010.

What is the purpose of the CDP?2023-05-12T11:34:39+00:00

The CDP initiative (previously known as the Carbon Disclosure Project) is used globally to encourage cities, governments and companies to disclose information about their environmental impact, helping to drive action on critical sustainability issues such as climate change, water security and deforestation. The CDP aims to create a more sustainable future by providing a platform for cities, organisations and governments to report on their environmental impact and to be held accountable for their sustainability practices. The CDP report provides a standardised framework for environmental impacts to be disclosed, learnings to be taken and actions for improvement to be taken. The purpose of CDP is to promote and encourage environmental sustainability, driving action to achieve a more sustainable future globally. Ecometrica helps companies disclose to the CDP.

What are CDP reports?2023-08-24T14:23:03+00:00

A CDP report is a comprehensive report that cities and organisations undertake as part of a global CDP (previously known as the Carbon Disclosure Project) initiative. The CDP report is used to calculate an organisation or a city’s CDP score, which is a rating of its environmental impact and risks, assessing all progress towards its sustainability goals. Companies and cities are scored on a scale of 0-100 based on the quality and quantity of their environmental disclosure, and the results are used to benchmark their performance against their peers and to drive improvements in sustainability practices globally. A CDP report records a range of key sustainability factors, including energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, water management and deforestation. A CDP report follows a universal framework, ensuring that the results are standardised, transparent and accurate, helping to inform future sustainability targets and actions.

How do you conduct an impact report?2023-08-01T09:34:58+00:00

You can conduct an impact report using Ecometrica’s step-by-step guide:

1. Define the scope: Determine what activities, products, and services will be included within the impact report, and identify the key sustainability issues and impacts that will be measured and reported.

2. Develop impact indicators: Select the impact indicators that will be used to measure and report the impact of your organisation’s operations and activities. Indicators should be aligned with your organisation’s sustainability objectives and targets, and should be relevant, measurable, and verifiable.

3. Collect data: Gather data from internal systems, third-party sources, and stakeholders. The data should be collected and managed in a robust and transparent manner, and should be verified for accuracy and completeness.

4. Analyse and report: Analyse the impact data, and report the results using a set of sustainability metrics and indicators. The results should be presented in a meaningful and accessible format, and should be accompanied by relevant case studies and examples that demonstrate the impact of your organisation’s work.

5. Engage stakeholders: Engage with stakeholders, including customers, employees, suppliers and communities, better understanding their sustainability needs and concerns, and involving them within the impact reporting process.

6. Continuously improve: Use the impact report to inform continuous improvement, and to identify areas where your organisation can improve its sustainability performance and impact. Regularly review and update the impact report to ensure that it remains relevant and up-to-date.

What is an impact reporting framework?2023-03-08T07:43:27+00:00

An impact reporting framework is a structure used to measure and report the social, environmental and economic impact of an organisation’s operations and activities. The framework provides a consistent approach for all organisations looking to measure and communicate their impact, with a defined scope and methodology to be used for data to be collected and reported. An impact report framework typically includes the following key components:

– Sustainability objectives and targets: A clear definition of the sustainability goals and objectives that an organisation aims to achieve, and a roadmap for how these goals will be met.

– Impact indicators – A set of impact indicators that are aligned with an organisation’s sustainability objectives and targets, and that are used to measure and report on the impact of its operations and activities.

– Data collection and management – A robust and transparent system for collecting, managing, and verifying impact data, including data from internal systems, third-party sources, and stakeholders.

– Data analysis and reporting – A method for analysing and reporting impact data, including the use of sustainability metrics and indicators, and the presentation of results in a meaningful and accessible format.

– Stakeholder engagement – A plan for engaging with stakeholders, including customers, employees, suppliers, and communities, to understand their sustainability needs and concerns and to involve them in the impact reporting process.

The purpose of an impact reporting framework is to provide organisations with a consistent and transparent approach to measure and report their impact, supporting informed decision-making and continuous improvement. By using a universal framework such as the GHG Protocol, organisations can benchmark their performance, identify best practices, and promote greater transparency and accountability in their sustainability reporting.

What does impact report mean?2023-03-08T07:43:27+00:00

An Impact report focuses on understanding and recording an organisation’s social, environmental and economic impact. The objective of the report is to provide stakeholders with information on the tangible results and outcomes of an organisation’s operations and activities, demonstrating its impact on people, communities and the environment. Impact reporting typically reflects the progress that an organisation is making towards specific sustainability goals, the outcomes and results of their sustainability initiatives. An Impact report can also include information on the sustainability performance of the supply chain and other business partners. Impact reporting is becoming increasingly important as organisations seek to demonstrate the positive benefits of their sustainability efforts, providing stakeholders with more comprehensive information on their sustainability performance. By tracking and reporting their impact, organisations can show their progress towards sustainability goals, reducing their environmental and social impact. Impact reporting is a key area of sustainability reporting and is often used in combination with other forms of reporting, such as sustainability reports, integrated reports, and corporate social responsibility (CSR) reports.

What does an impact report include?2023-08-01T09:39:35+00:00

An impact report typically includes information on the social, environmental and economic impact of an organisation’s operations and activities. The content of an impact report is unique to each organisation, but it usually includes the following elements:

– Sustainability objectives and targets – Information on the sustainability goals an organisation has set and its progress towards achieving them

– Impact data – Detailed data on the tangible results and outcomes of an organisation’s sustainability initiatives, such as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction, energy and water efficiency, and waste reduction.

– Stakeholder engagement – Information on how an organisation engages with stakeholders, including customers, employees, suppliers, and communities, to understand their sustainability needs and concerns.

– Supply chain sustainability – Information on the sustainability performance of an organisation’s suppliers and business partners, including efforts to reduce environmental and social impacts in the supply chain.

Case studies and stories – Detailed examples demonstrating the impact of an organisation’s sustainability initiatives, including any positive or negative impacts on people, communities and the environment.

– Future plans and commitments – Information on an organisation’s plans and commitments for the future, including new sustainability initiatives and targets.

– Metrics and indicators – Use of sustainability metrics and indicators, such as GHG emissions, energy and water efficiency, and waste reduction, to track and report on an organisation’s sustainability performance.

What is impact reporting?2023-03-08T07:43:28+00:00

Impact reporting focuses on understanding and recording an organisation’s social, environmental and economic impact. The objective of the report is to provide stakeholders with information on the tangible results and outcomes of an organisation’s operations and activities, demonstrating its impact on people, communities and the environment. Impact reporting typically reflects the progress that an organisation is making towards specific sustainability goals, the outcomes and results of their sustainability initiatives. An Impact report can also include information on the sustainability performance of the supply chain and other business partners. Impact reporting is becoming increasingly important as organisations seek to demonstrate the positive benefits of their sustainability efforts, providing stakeholders with more comprehensive information on their sustainability performance. By tracking and reporting their impact, organisations can show their progress towards sustainability goals, reducing their environmental and social impact. Impact reporting is a key area of sustainability reporting and is often used in combination with other forms of reporting, such as integrated reports and corporate social responsibility (CSR) reports.

What is sustainable reporting? / sustainability reporting2023-03-08T07:43:28+00:00

Sustainable reporting is the process that organisations use to disclose information on their sustainability performance and environmental impact. The aim of sustainable reporting is to provide a comprehensive view of an organisation’s sustainability performance and communicate the impact of its operations and activities on people, the planet and future generations. Sustainable reporting focuses on environmental, social and governance factors, which are often referred to as ESG factors. Sustainability reporting can take different formats and focus on different areas of sustainability, including integrated reports and corporate social responsibility (CSR) reports. These types of reports typically disclose information on an organisation’s sustainability strategy, governance, operations, products and services, supply chain and stakeholders. Sustainability reporting helps organisations to demonstrate their dedication to responsible and sustainable business practices, engaging with stakeholders and communicating the impact of their operations and activities on the environment, society and the economy.

Do I need a CDP assessment?2023-03-08T07:43:28+00:00

The requirement for a CDP assessment is unique to each individual or business. Organisations and cities around the world are encouraged to conduct CDP assessments as part of the CDP (formerly known as the Carbon Disclosure Project) global initiative, disclosing how they are having an impact on the environment, which includes their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CDP assessments are an important tool for businesses and cities, allowing them to understand their GHG emissions, setting targets and actioning these to reduce their emissions, moving towards more sustainable practices for the future.

What is a CDP score?2023-08-24T14:23:33+00:00

A CDP score is a rating system used by the CDP, you previously may have known them as the Carbon Disclosure Project. The CDP assess the performance of a diverse range of companies and cities looking specifically at how they manage their environmental impact, which includes their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. A CDP score is used by companies, investors and governments to understand and compare their environmental impact. A CDP score reflects the level of transparency, action and progress an organisation is taking to reduce their GHG emissions, and is scored from A (the highest score) to D- (the lowest score). If an organisation’s CDP score is high (A the highest score), it demonstrates dedication and commitment to lowering GHG emissions and their overall environmental impact, ensuring that they are moving towards a more sustainable future.

Do I need a GHG emissions assessment?2023-03-08T07:44:06+00:00

The requirement for a Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions assessment is unique to each individual or business. Some companies and organisations are required to carry out GHG emissions assessments to ensure that they meet regulatory requirements, whereas other businesses are not required to carry out this type of assessment, however they do so to measure and record their greenhouse gas emissions, putting strategies in place to reduce them. Many companies choose to conduct GHG emissions assessments as it meets their organisational objectives to be more sustainable for the future.

What are GHG emissions?2023-03-08T11:59:53+00:00

Greenhouse Gases, often referred to as GHG, are a group of gases that trap heat within the earth’s atmosphere and contribute to the greenhouse gas effect. The greenhouse gases that are trapped within the atmosphere cause the earth’s temperature to rise. Gases that are included within the GHG group are:

-Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

-Methane (CH4)

-Nitrous Oxide (N2O)

-Fluorinated Gases (F-gases)

GHG emissions relate to the release of these gases into the atmosphere as a result of human activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels, industrial processes, agriculture, and deforestation. These greenhouse gas emissions trap heat within the earth’s atmosphere and contribute to climate change, leading to rising global temperatures and causing changes in weather patterns and sea levels.

Measuring and reducing GHG emissions is a crucial step in mitigating the impacts of climate change and supporting a more sustainable future. By understanding and tracking GHG emissions, individuals and organisations can identify the sources of their emissions and develop strategies to reduce them. This information is used to inform sustainability reporting, support informed decision-making, and measure progress towards reducing emissions and reaching a low-carbon future.

What are the carbon footprint categories?2023-11-23T15:13:31+00:00

The carbon footprint is broken down into a number of categories so that they can be measured and therefore reduced by individuals and businesses. Emissions typically fall into the following categories:

– Energy use – Emissions that are generated from the use of energy in buildings, transportation, and other activities.

– Agriculture and Land Use – Emissions that are generated from agriculture, forestry, and land use changes, such as deforestation.

– Industry – Emissions that are generated from industrial processes, such as the production of goods and materials.

– Waste – Emissions that are generated from waste disposal, including landfills and wastewater treatment.

– Food and drink – Emissions that are generated from the production, transportation, and consumption of food and drinks.

– Transportation – Emissions that are generated from the use of vehicles and other forms of transportation.

– Goods and Services – Emissions that are generated from the production and transportation of goods and services consumed by an individual or organisation.

By understanding and measuring these categories, individuals and organisations can identify the sources of their emissions and develop strategies to reduce them. This information is used to inform sustainability reporting, support informed decision-making, and measure progress towards reducing emissions and reaching a low-carbon future.

Is water included in Scope 3 emissions?2023-03-08T07:44:06+00:00

Water usage is not typically included in Scope 3 emissions. The Greenhouse Gas Protocol which defines Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions, only covers emissions of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Water usage is not considered a greenhouse gas and is therefore not included in the scopes of emissions, however water can have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions and sustainability.

What are Scope 1 Scope 2 and Scope 3 emissions?2023-08-24T14:18:30+00:00

Scope 1, 2 and 3 are different types of emissions. They are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol, which is an international accounting tool that governments and businesses use to track and report their greenhouse gas emissions. They exist to stop double-counting. Emission fall into these categories based on their source, and are used to measure the carbon footprint of an organisation or individual.

– Scope 1 – These emissions are direct emissions from sources that are owned or controlled by the organisation or individual. Examples include emissions from on-site combustion of fossil fuels (e.g. boilers and vehicles) and emissions from industrial processes.

– Scope 2 – These emissions are caused indirectly from the generation of purchased electricity, heat, or steam that an organisation or individual consumes. These emissions are generated by power plants and other energy suppliers and are considered indirect because they are not under the control of the organisation or individual.

Scope 3 – These emissions are all other indirect emissions not included in Scope 2. Examples include emissions from the production of purchased goods and services, waste disposal, and employee commuting. It is important that businesses and individuals understand Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions, recording this information and using it to inform strategies to reduce their emissions, helping to move towards a low-carbon future.

What are zero carbon requirements?2023-03-08T07:44:06+00:00

Zero carbon requirements are regulations or policies that aim to reduce or eliminate carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in a specific sector or industry. The aim of these requirements is to reach a “zero carbon” state, where the total amount of CO2 emissions produced is equal to zero, or as close to zero as possible. Zero carbon requirements can be implemented at a national, regional, or local level, and can include targets for reducing emissions, mandatory reporting of emissions, and incentives for companies or individuals to adopt low-carbon practices. Examples of zero carbon requirements include:

1. Zero carbon building standards, which require new buildings to have low or zero carbon emissions.

2. Zero carbon transportation policies, which promote the use of low-emission vehicles and alternative modes of transportation.

3. Zero carbon energy policies, which promote the use of renewable energy and aim to phase out the use of fossil fuels.

4. Zero carbon food production and consumption policies, which promote sustainable agriculture and low-carbon diets. These requirements are part of a larger effort to mitigate climate change and make our future more sustainable. Zero carbon requirements play an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and are helping to prevent the most damaging impacts of climate change. They encourage everyone from small businesses and large organisations to individuals to adopt more sustainable practices and transition to a low-carbon economy.

How can I become carbon neutral?2023-08-24T14:25:53+00:00

Everyone can take steps to make the way they live carbon neutral, from reducing personal greenhouse gas emissions, to counteracting the impact of any remaining emissions through carbon credits. Follow Ecometrica’s step by step guide to live a more carbon neutral lifestyle:

1. Evaluate your personal carbon footprint, including transportation, energy use, food, and waste.

2. Reduce your energy use by making changes such as using public transportation, carpooling, biking or walking where possible, switching to LED lighting options, and upgrading appliances to more energy-efficient models.

3. Reduce food waste and choose a diet that has a lower carbon footprint, such as reducing meat consumption or choosing locally-sourced and seasonal products.

4. Reduce waste and increase recycling to minimise emissions from waste disposal.

5. Counteract any remaining emissions by purchasing carbon credits or supporting renewable energy projects that remove carbon from the atmosphere.

6. Regularly monitor and review your personal progress, setting new goals, and making further improvements over time.

Becoming carbon neutral is a personal responsibility for everyone, and is an important step in addressing climate change. Making changes to be more carbon neutral can have a number of positive impacts, not only on the environment, but also on your finances, and your personal health and well-being.

How can I get net zero at home?2023-06-23T08:41:56+00:00

You can move towards a net zero home by reducing your greenhouse gas emissions, as well as counteracting any remaining emissions through carbon credits or any similar activities. Follow our steps to achieve a net zero home:

1. Conduct an energy audit to identify areas for improvement and potential emissions reduction opportunities.

2. Implement energy-saving measures such as improving and installing more efficient insulation, switching to LED lighting options, and upgrading appliances to more energy-efficient models.

3. Evaluate your home’s carbon footprint, including heating, cooling, transportation, and waste management, and identify where you can make reductions and introduce improvements.

4. Switch to renewable energy sources, such as solar or wind power, or consider enrolling in a green energy program offered by your utility company.

5. Reduce waste and increase recycling to minimise emissions from waste disposal.

6. Counteract any remaining emissions your home may have by purchasing carbon credits or supporting renewable energy projects that remove carbon from the atmosphere.

7. Regularly monitor and review your progress, set new goals, and make further improvements over time. Achieving a net zero home will take time, but by following Ecometrica’s steps you can help to reduce your carbon footprint, which in turn will help to make a positive impact on the environment. Taking action to make your home net zero will also help to save you money on things like energy bills, as well as increasing the resale value of your home.

How can a small business become carbon neutral?2023-06-02T14:18:23+00:00

There are a number of ways small businesses can become carbon neutral, striving to achieve this through realistic and manageable actions. Here are some small steps Ecometrica have put together to help small businesses become carbon neutral:

1. Conduct an energy audit to identify areas for improvement and potential emissions reduction opportunities.

2. Implement energy-saving measures such as improving and installing more efficient insulation, switching to LED lighting options, and upgrading equipment to more energy-efficient models.

3. Measure the amount of carbon emissions your business operations and supply chain produces, including transportation and waste management – these are sometimes referred to as scope 1, scope 2 and scope 3 emissions. For help understanding your business emissions and for guidance on how to reduce these, contact Ecometrica to speak to our expert team.

4. Implement strategies to reduce emissions, such as using renewable energy sources, reducing waste, and improving the fuel efficiency of vehicles.

5. Counteract remaining emissions by purchasing carbon credits or supporting renewable energy projects that remove carbon from the atmosphere.

6. Regularly monitor and report on progress, set new goals, and make further improvements over time to ensure your business is moving towards a carbon neutral future.

Is sustainability the same as net-zero?2023-06-23T08:09:45+00:00

The terms net zero and sustainability have different meanings, but look to broadly achieve the same goal, so can often be confused as the same thing. -Net Zero – The balance between emissions produced and the removals that are achieved. This means that the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere is equal to the amount that are removed. -Sustainability – Taking actions to avoid depletion and damage to natural resources, it encompasses a variety of aspects from reducing waste and pollution to promoting social equality. Net zero is an important part of creating a more sustainable future.

What is the difference between net zero and zero carbon?2023-06-23T08:43:22+00:00

Net zero and Zero carbon are both terms that refer to achieving a balance between greenhouse gas emissions and removals. However, there are a few differences between the meanings of each term: –Net Zero – The balance between emissions produced and the removals that are achieved. This means that the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere is equal to the amount that are removed. -Zero Carbon – The total elimination of carbon dioxide (CO2) within emissions. The aim of Zero carbon is to ensure that emissions are reduced as much as possible, with any remaining emissions being counteracted by carbon removal schemes. When comparing the two terms, net zero refers to all greenhouse gas emissions, and zero carbon relates only to CO2 emissions.

Go to Top